Stroman prevails in arbitration case

Stroman prevails in arbitration case

DUNEDIN, Fla. -- Blue Jays right-hander Marcus Stroman picked up a win on the first official day of Spring Training. This one just happened to be against his own team.

Stroman won his arbitration case and will earn $3.4 million this season in news that broke Tuesday afternoon. Toronto previously filed at $3.1 million but after hearing the case, an independent arbiter ruled in favor of Stroman.

The 25-year-old was in camp on Monday as pitchers and catchers reported for their physicals but he declined to speak with reporters during a brief interaction. He is coming off a season in which he went 9-10 with a 4.37 ERA over 32 starts and 204 innings.

"Excited to win my case," Stroman later wrote on Twitter. "Really enjoyed the process ... Shout [out] to the Blue Jays for being extremely professional throughout the entire process as well."

The arbitration case was the final piece of business Toronto had to settle before camp got underway. The Blue Jays currently have a payroll of approximately $165 million once you factor in salaries around the league minimum for their pre-arbitration players. That's approximately the number Toronto was expected to have in 2017, but there could be some additional funds made available for trades during the season.

Toronto's roster appears mostly set with the possible exception of left field where Ezequiel Carrera and Melvin Upton Jr. are expected to platoon but could receive some competition from Dalton Pompey. Blue Jays general manager Ross Atkins hasn't ruled out adding another outfielder before the end of camp but as of Monday afternoon nothing appeared imminent.

Stroman has spent parts of the last three seasons in Toronto while going 24-16 with a 3.91 ERA. He will be part of a rotation that also includes Aaron Sanchez, Marco Estrada, J.A. Happ and Francisco Liriano in a starting five that is expected to be one of the best in the American League.

This was Stroman's first year of arbitration eligibility but as a Super 2 player he remains under control for another four years. He cannot become a free agent until after the 2021 season.

Gregor Chisholm has covered the Blue Jays for MLB.com since 2011. Follow him on Twitter @gregorMLB and Facebook, and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.