Snider on slow timetable after injury

Snider on slow timetable after injury

TORONTO -- Blue Jays fans hoping for a quick return to the big leagues for outfielder Travis Snider will have to be patient. The young left fielder is currently on the Minor League disabled list with a back injury and is not expected to be back on the diamond until early July.

"It'll probably be another two more weeks," Blue Jays general manager J.P. Ricciardi said on Sunday.

Snider, 21, tweaked his back after appearing in only eight games for Triple-A Las Vegas, following his demotion to the Minors on May 22. Ricciardi said Snider initially hurt his back when he was younger, but the injury didn't present any problems during the left-handed-hitting outfielder's stay with the Jays earlier this season.

"It flared up more when he got to Triple-A," Ricciardi said.

Snider -- selected with the 14th overall pick in the 2006 First-Year Player Draft -- opened this season as the Blue Jays' starting left fielder after an impressive showing during Spring Training. Through 32 games with Toronto, though, Snider struggled with consistency at the plate and hit .242 with three home runs and 12 RBIs before being sent to Vegas.

In eight games at Triple-A, Snider hit at a .258 clip with two RBIs, going 0-for-4 in his last appearance on May 31. With Snider currently shelved, the Jays added depth by signing outfielder David Dellucci to a Minor League contract on Wednesday. Dellucci is currently at Triple-A, but is on the short list to receive a call to Toronto.

Jays sign picks: Toronto has signed 20 players selected by the club in last week's First-Year Player Draft. The highest pick to agree to a contract was left-hander Egan Smith (Southern Nevada College), who was selected in the seventh round. Other notable signings included first baseman Lance Durham (14th round), who is the son of former Major Leaguer Leon Durham, and shortstop Jonathan Fernandez, the son of former Jays shortstop Tony Fernandez.

Jordan Bastian is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.